Needle Free

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The oldest known medical book on oriental medicine, The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, thought to
have been written around 3000 B.C., mentions the practice of placing magnets on acupuncture points. Magnetic acupuncture has been used in the East in many forms right up to the present. Today, the practice has evolved into applying tiny magnetic discs to acupuncture points. In the West, Swiss physician Marcus Weber (1992) describes the results of a study of using pulsed magnetic fields on 1,712 patients with inflammation, joint and organ disorders, fractures and acute injuries, and circulatory disorders. Over 60% of the evaluating physicians described the outcomes as good or very good. No negative side effects were observed.

Needle Free

In a clinical setting, a diagnosis is made after an interview and after feeling the patient’s pulse to find out the root causes of the complaints. The practitioner may also need to observe the shape and color of the patient’s tongue. After an initial evaluation, the practitioner will provide a treatment plan that includes the types, the frequency, and the duration of the treatment. A normal series of treatments consists of five to ten sessions. Sometimes the practitioner may recommend a multi-dimensional approach that may include nutritional supplements, Chinese herbs, dietary changes, etc. Acupuncture points along relevant meridians will be treated by taping tiny magnets to the skin. The patient should remove the magnets after 2-12 hours, and return them at the next visit. It is important to treat a chronic condition for a period of time after the pain is gone to insure complete healing, and even strengthening. This will make a relapse less likely.